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Biological Sciences

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Janice Speshock, PhD

Assistant Professor
  • PhD, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 2007
  • Postdoctoral Fellowship, National Research Council/Defense Threat Reduction Agency
Email: speshock@tarleton.edu
Phone: 254-968-9341
Office: SCI 213J


Courses:

  • Microbiology
  • Pathogenic Microbiology
  • Immunology

Research Interests:

My research interests revolve around how the host immune system responds to foreign entities.  I currently have two major projects in my laboratory.  One project focuses on assessing the impact of engineered nanomaterials on immune system function.  In the process my lab is generating an inexpensive in vivo model to study nanomaterial toxicity and biolocalization for assessment of environmental and health implications following use or fabrication of nanomaterials.  The other major project in my lab is a study on how bacteria regulate the production of virulence factors to influence colonization and pathology within a host.  In addition, students in my lab are determining any contributing effects of the host immune system to pathology observed following bacterial exposure.

Publications:

  • Speshock, JL, LK Braydich-Stolle, ER Szymanski, and SM Hussain.  “Silver and Gold Nanoparticles Alter Cathepsin Activity In vitro.”  Nanoscale Research Letters, 6:17, 2011.
  • Speshock, JL, RC Murdock, LK Braydich-Stolle, AM Schrand, and SM Hussain.  “Interaction of silver nanoparticles with tacaribe virus.”  J. of Nanobiotechnology, 8:19, 2010.
  • Braydich-Stolle LK, JL Speshock, A Castle, M Smith, and S Hussain.  “Nano-sized Aluminum Suppressed Immune Function.”  ACS Nano, 4(7): 3661-3670, 2010.
  • Rogers, JV, CV Parkinson, YW Choi, JL Speshock, and SM Hussain. “A preliminary assessment of silver-containing nanoparticles inhibiting monkeypox virus plaque formation in vitro.  Nanoscale Research Letters, 3: 129-133, 2008.
  • Speshock, JL, N Doyon-Reale, R Rabah, MN Neely, and PC Roberts. “Filamentous influenza A virus infection predisposes mice to fatal septicemia following superinfection with Streptococcus pneumoniae (serotype 3).  Infection and Immunity, 75: 3102-3111, 2007.